YVETTE’S STORY of MEMORIES TO MOMENTUM, Part I

MONDAY’S MUSING: YVETTE’S STORY of MEMORIES TO MOMENTUM

“My mom is a miracle to me.”

 

Designer of children’s clothing, in her mid-30s; as a child, lived in an eastern town with her mother and 1 older sister; single, no children.                              

© By Niki Glanz, Posted 3/23/18

I had an immediate flash: a happy, childhood memory that I’ve kept for a long time. It was a beautiful spring day, an old town, overarching, very green trees. My sister, my mom, and I must have gone to the library and were headed home.

The memory involves finding this wooden structure: a hollow frame of probably sixteen two-by-fours, part of the debris from construction that was going on. I was probably five or six, so my sister would have been seven. We each grabbed a section, put our bodies through the little squares, and pretended it was a train. My mother was definitely in the front, and probably I was in the middle because someone bigger – my sister – would have held up the end. We carried it home that way.

That thing went into our toy room; we stood it up and pretended it was a phone booth, we put cardboard boxes in each of the sections to make storage trays for our Barbie dolls, we turned it on its side to create a fort. That’s definitely my mom, turning anything free into something positive and long lasting. My mom wasn’t working: she was home with both of us. We were on public assistance, but I didn’t know that as a child.

My mom was not given a lot of advantages and did not have a very supportive family structure. There’s no reason for her to have created this life for me, other than her intelligence, her wit, her soul, and her charm. She’s a miracle to me.

My mom is adorable: five feet, brown eyes, chestnutty hair that she’s always pulled into a barrette at the back of her head. Glasses, round face, a little bit stocky; we’re all kind of short, round, and stocky. Very youthful looking. And clothes are really important to her – not important, fun – like finding the right chartreuse earrings to go with some pants.

My father not being present was a disappointment, but I never wanted for clothes, or food, or shelter. You didn’t get what you wanted because you wanted it. It was, “OK, ask for that for your birthday,” or, “Save your allowance.” One of the values my mother has instilled in me is: life doesn’t give you lemons, life gives you your life! You do with it the best you can.

 

VISIT FRIDAY, 3/30, for THE CONCLUSION OF YVETTE’S STORY

Memories Matter. We often find the way forward by looking back. Thanks for reading!

Your comments are welcome! Please email them to: [email protected]

 

clothing designer, mom, mother, spring, welfare, scavenger, willpower, courage, divorce, values, allowance